Britain Employment

Which Jobs Deserve To Be Paid More Money?

13:56Ciaran McCormick

The average salary in the UK is around £26,000  but a poll from HR consultancy Reabur found that 93% of people feel underpaid. In a world where we can watch footballer salaries increase in real time 
and wages feel entirely out of touch with the work actually being conducted, some professions stand out as starkly underpaid.

These are examples where people offer immense value to society and experience tough conditions. Whilst they may be lauded as heroes of our country, the financial rewards rarely follow.

1) Ambulance Dispatch Workers



















These are the people on the other end of the call you make on the worst day of your life. They talk people through childbirth, experience people's final moments and get abused. They have to learn CPR, experience shifts with paramedics and face overwhelming stress but still only earn between £15,000 and £26,000.

2) Teachers












Teachers have to work all hours of the working day and weekends and plan lessons through their holidays. They deal with the stress of pupils, parents, inspections and marking. There is a chronic shortage of teachers because of the overwhelming conditions. The pay starts at £22,467 in England and Wales and reaches a maximum of £33,160 for a normal teacher.


3) Cleaners

These people are the tip of the workforce that wakes early and keeps the world moving. Cleaners have a backbreaking job that we would quickly notice if it disappeared. They should be respected more for doing what many of us would be too squeamish to stomach.


4) Junior doctors and nurses

This is a well known struggle as in recent years junior doctors have faced unsociable contracts imposed on them. They now work on Saturday as standard, despite their low starting salary of around £23,000, which is absurd considering the importance of their work


5) Firefighters



















When we were children, firefighters were the epitome of cool, rushing into some of the most dangerous situations to pull off heroic rescues. However, we grew up and appreciate the immense challenges and bravery of this situation, as well as the difficult shift patterns. Believe it or not, the starting salary is just over £22,000 and in the 30s for managers.

6) Chef

If you can't handle the heat, the low wages, the pressurised working environment and the unsociable hours, get out of the kitchen. Seriously. It isn't all free food, cookbooks and TV gigs.

7) Care Worker


Capitalism has fooled us into thinking that economic productivity is the hallmark of a real job. This means that employment that doesn't make money but stiches together the fabric of our society such as raising children or caring for loved ones isn't worth subsidising. Carers earn roughly between £14,000 and £19,000 a year for a tough job.

8) University Tutors


The education sector has come under fire in recent years for employing Higher Education staff on precarious contracts. They don't get paid a full wage and lack full employment benefits as a way to keep costs down. This is despite their exceptional qualifications and prices some of the best out of the profession.

9) Call Centre Workers



















Having worked in a call centre myself for three years, I appreciate how hard this job can be. You are either dealing with inbound calls from complaining customers or cold calling a cruel public. Its entry level work, but a salary higher than the average of £19,000 might go a long way to help retain the best people and keep them motivated.


10) Prison Officer

Dealing with the worst people in society who have committed awful crimes and having to keep them contained in unpleasant conditions is a tough ask. The situations change and you need a robust personality to cope. But the starting salary is just over £20,000.

11) Bus Drivers

The national average salary for a train driver is over £47,000. Whilst they are skilled and trained, bus drivers are also responsible for the lives of the public and are much more exposed to people than their railway equivalents and yet the national average is just over £20,000.

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